Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 3

Hello again! We welcome returning readers and newcomers!  For new readers to this site, we would like to introduce you to Dr. Scharf.  Our Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions on various health conditions which concern all of us, especially when health issues about overall general health, related to dental health, oral health, and gum disease, are the topic at hand.  We recently began a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are related.  Come along with us as we continue to explore this topic, with today’s segment discussing peptic stomach ulcers.

Inflammation

In past segments, as well as previous article series, we have talked about inflammation and some of the nightmares it causes in our mouths.  We have related to you the fact that this inflammation begins with bacteria feeding off residues left behind in your mouth from inadequate or infrequent cleanings, toothbrushing, and flossing.  We have emphasized the importance of good oral hygiene in every member of the family, to prevent the inflammation, resulting from less than desirable oral health, from getting into the bloodstream and traveling everywhere and anywhere in the body.

Peptic Stomach Ulcers

Sores or abrasions that develop in the lining of the stomach or upper part of the small intestine are called peptic ulcers.  The most commonly noted symptom of peptic ulcers are stomach pain, and this is true whether it is a gastric ulcer (occurring on the inside of the stomach) or duodenal (occurring in the upper section of the small intestine).  Here are some of the other symptoms you might notice if you have one of these types of ulcers:
A burning feeling of pain in the stomach

  • Feeling like you’re bloated, full, or belching
  • Problems eating fatty foods
  • The burning sensation in your throat that we call “heartburn”
  • Feelings of nausea which are sometimes transient

While most people will tell you that stress and spicy foods are the cause of this sickness, your takeaway is that these do not create a peptic ulcer.  They will exacerbate the symptoms mentioned above, to be sure, but they aren’t the reason for the ulcer.

In our next segment, we will talk a bit more about these symptoms and the role that stomach acid plays in them.  Until then, we encourage you to seek to establish with a dental professional who can help. Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any of its stages in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or pay him a visit online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 2

We welcome back our returning readers and any newcomers to our blog!  For those of you who may be new to this blog site, let me introduce you to Dr. Scharf.  He is a Periodontist in Long Island and he loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions about a variety of health conditions which concern all of us.  This is especially so when there are health issues pertaining to overall general health which are related to dental health, oral health, and gum disease. Our last segment began a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are related.  You’re invited to join us as we continue this journey over the next several weeks.

A brief review

In our last segment, we briefly explained how the debris left behind from normal eating and drinking gets stuck to the internal surfaces of your mouth.  We further explained that, if these internal surfaces are not cleaned appropriately and regularly, the debris develops into inflammation, plaque, and the constant flow of nasty bacteria, via your bloodstream, into all parts of your body.

Stomach Ulcers

Gum disease, and the inflammation that accompanies it has been the subject of a great deal of research over the past several decades.  Direct connections have been established between gum disease and several major health problems, and even some life-threatening diseases, and stomach ulcers are among some of those discoveries.  The connection which has been established between gum disease and ulcers lies in the bacteria which is at the heart of the gum disease. It seems that these same periodontal disease bacteria are the very ones which cause stomach ulcers.  If the flow of these bacteria is not controlled, re-infections and new ulcers can occur.

The best way to control all of that inflammation is to brush your teeth and floss several times a day and keep up with regular dental examinations.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631) 661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.   Be sure to come back for the next segment of this important article series.

 

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 1

Welcome back, returning readers and newcomers to our blog!  If you are new to this blog site, you may not be aware that Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions about a variety of health conditions which concern all of us.  He especially likes to educate his followers with these health maladies as they relate to overall oral health and gum disease. Today, we are beginning a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are connected.  As we embark upon this journey over the next several weeks, you’re invited to join us.

Gum Disease

Before we get started, let’s first review briefly so that we all understand what gum disease is and what is so dangerous about it. The most straightforward description of gum disease is: it is inflammation, caused by food and drink deposits left behind between the teeth and along the gum line which, if not properly removed, can cause bacterial growth, not all of which is good. There are both good bacteria as well as harmful bacteria in your mouth, coexisting in that lovely moist environment.  An ongoing battle waged between these types of bacteria, and sometimes the bad guys overrun the good guys, kind of like the fighting between the cowboys and Indians in the old West movies some of us grew up watching on television. 

The Why of this Battle

You see, when you chew food and drink liquids, pieces and films remain on the internal surfaces of your mouth, teeth, tongue, and gums. These foreign particles get lodged between the teeth and along the gum line, where bacteria naturally abide. The problem arises when this foreign material is not adequately removed by the brushing and flossing that is part of a good oral health regimen. When not suitably cleaned, bacteria begin to feed off it and grow, festering into an infection (also known as inflammation). This inflammation gets down below the gum line, eventually getting into the bloodstream, where it is transported to all parts of the body, into every organ and tissue type, wreaking havoc wherever it goes.

Next time, we will take the next step toward the connection between gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers.  Until then, we encourage you to make your next step getting established with a great dental professional.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in the role, he can identify and treat gum disease in your whole family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 7

We welcome our returning readers and those of you who are new to this blog!  We appreciate your return for the last segment of this article series. If you have been following this blog for any length of time, we probably don’t need to tell you Dr. Scharf has long been reputed for devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  If you aren’t acquainted with Dr. David Scharf, allow me to introduce you to a man who is a Periodontist in Long Island, who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research, primarily as it influences their lives and those they love, who are afflicted with gum disease.  He thoroughly enjoys sharing information pertinent to his readers and patients health and well-being. This current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we have hoped to familiarize you with the incredible technological options which are available for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our past postings, we have been discussing the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation.  We invite you to continue this journey with us as we conclude this article series on dental implantation treatment with the promised discussion about post placement and final crown placement.  

Post Placement

Last week, we left off with the bone grafting technique having been completed and healing time commencing.  As we stated in the last segment of this series, this particular step in the dental implantation process generally requires at least four months of healing.  This healing time is only an estimate because each of our bodies is different regarding the healing properties of various types of tissue.

Once the gum and bone grafting sites are determined by Dr. Scharf to have healed sufficiently, he then proceeds with the placing of the posts for the dental implants.  These posts, made of titanium, are the new “roots” for your dental implants, and they are placed directly into the jawbone tissue. Local numbing medication is given, a hole pre-drilled into the jawbone, making it easier to insert the post.  Dr. Scharf then places the post into the pre-drilled hole and closes the gum tissue around it.

As you might expect, as with other steps in the process which involved cutting or drilling, Dr. Scharf must allow for time for healing before the final steps completed.  The healing of the bone and gum tissue, as well as the integration of the post with that tissue, requires approximately 4 to 6 months of time. Once appropriately healed, the head of the post uncovered and an abutment attached which will hold the final crown.

Final Crown Placement

The placement of the final crown may resemble that of the fitting required for dentures and bridges in that impressions must be made of the exposed post abutments and adjacent areas to ensure that an order placed for the crown will fit perfectly. For your new crown to blend in with the rest of your existing teeth (whether natural or implanted), a color matching process will be performed at the time of the impression.  Once these steps are taken, the order for your new crown is placed. Your new dental implant crown will most likely take a couple of weeks to be available, at which time, Dr. Scharf’s office will contact you for the visit to finish the job. The most significant part of this whole process is that your wait is over — since everything will have healed at each stage in the treatment when your crown placed, you can display it immediately for the world to see!

Though these steps seem like forever to complete, the result will be nothing short of miraculous, allowing you to beam that bright smile at everyone you meet.  Throughout the process, Dr. Scharf and his entire team are there for you, just as they are now, as you become established and consider your treatment options for the treatment of gum disease in any member of your family.  Call Dr. Scharf at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com. He wants to be your Periodontist on Long Island, and he wants to tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 6

Hello, again!  We are happy that you are returning to the next segment of this article series, and we welcome our faithful followers as well as our new readers joining us for the first time!  As ongoing followers of this blog, I’m sure you will agree that we have already established that we have a long-standing reputation for devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  Dr. David Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research. And since it influences the lives of those afflicted with gum disease, he loves to share any information which he feels is pertinent to his readers and patients.  This current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we hope to familiarize you with the incredible technological options which are available for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our past postings, we have been discussing the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation.  We invite you to join us as we continue this journey on the road to dental implantation treatment.

Tooth Extraction

After the evaluation and the pre-implant surgery, the next step for most patients is tooth extraction. So, are you wondering why more teeth may need extracting when you’re considering dental implantation for already missing teeth?  That’s a great question, and here is your answer: sometimes, the remaining teeth in the area of concern for the dental implant placement or in the upper and lower plates may be damaged, cracked clear down to the root, or infected.  If the existing teeth aren’t reasonably healthy, you are at an increased risk of additional problems down the road. The damaged or otherwise unhealthy teeth extracted and a dental implant put back in its place, and, sometimes, Dr. Scharf can even use the socket from which the damaged or diseased tooth was removed, placing the dental implant the same day!  A word of caution is needed here: same day placement may not always be possible if the socket from which the tooth came needs more time to heal.

Bone Grafting

The next step for most dental implant patients is bone grafting.  As frequently happens, sometimes a tooth “goes missing” for a variety of reasons and is not replaced in a timely fashion, for a variety of extenuating circumstances.  Though this is quite understandable, it is important to point out that the jaw bone begins to resorb or melt away immediately — losing approximately 25% of its height within the first year after the tooth loss!  Why is this important, you may wonder? Since the jaw bone is the primary supporting structure for the dental implants and on which the crowns eventually mounted, if the height of the jaw bone structure is not uniform, the post and the final crown placement can be compromised.  If bone grafting is required to accommodate the dental implant, then a healing period of a minimum of four (4) months is needed before the next step can be taken.

Next time, we will discuss the post placement and the final crown placement to complete the steps involved in dental implant treatment.  Until then, we want to strongly urge you to seek a dental professional to evaluate and monitor gum and periodontal disease in every member of your family.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify, treat and monitor gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com and let him explain how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 5

Welcome back!  We welcome you, whether you are returning readers, faithful followers or new readers who are joining us for the first time!  For those of you who have been ongoing readers of this blog, we believe we have already established that we have a long-standing reputation for its devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  As you may already be aware, Dr. David Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who, understanding the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research, and how it influences the lives of those afflicted with it, loves to share any information which he feels is pertinent to his readers and patients.  Our current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we hope to familiarize you with the incredible technological options for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our last posting, we began a discussion about the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation. You are invited to ride along with us as we continue this journey on the road to dental implantation treatment.

More About the Evaluation

In our last blog post, we talked a bit about the evaluation, mentioning some general things which will be addressed by Dr. Scharf.  Dr. Scharf is a board certified Periodontist, but beyond that certification, he has amassed extra years of training in periodontal health as well as the process of placing the dental implants we’ve been discussing.  Because he has all of that extra training and experience, he will well-qualified to review the results of the examination itself, and the variety of imaging and testing, to determine what procedures for which you are best suited.  He will carefully examine and review the data, providing an in-depth explanation to you, to ensure you know exactly what conditions exist and what options are available to you.

Step Three:  Pre-Implant Surgery

Because some of the caused by gum disease can take years to surface in other systems and parts of our bodies, patients having periodontal disease who need dental implants may be relatively healthy beyond the destruction that is occurring in their mouths.  In this case, you’d likely be thinking that dental implant surgery could move forward fairly quickly, when in fact, the surgery to place the implants is delayed because of conditions in the mouth.  Now, the testing and imaging done in step two comes into play at this point, revealing the condition of the boney structures that need modification, or extra tooth removal to accommodate the dental implant, or even bone grafting needed to support the alveolar ridge.  While these procedures need time to heal like any other surgery, these surgeries will help your dental implants look and feel comfortable and attractive.

In our next post, we will discuss tooth extractions and bone grafting so that you have a better idea of the depth and details of the process.  Until then, we highly recommend that you call Dr. Scharf at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com.  He wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and he’ll be happy to tell you about how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 4

Greetings to all of our returning readers as well as to our faithful followers!  If you have been an ongoing reader of this blog, then we’re pretty sure you already know that it has a long-standing reputation for its devotion to the education of its readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf. Dr. David Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research into the deep dark world of gum disease and how it can influence the lives of those afflicted with it, something he loves sharing with his readers and patients.  Recently, we began a new article series on the process of dental implant treatment in which we hope to familiarize you with incredible more modern technology for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. Last time, our installment included a discussion on the various types of dental implants and how they work, and accordingly, now that you know a bit more about the types of dental implants commonly used, we think it is time to discuss the applications of the phases and the step-by-step process of these procedures. We invite you to take another step with us on this journey down the road leading to the methods of dental implant treatment.

Step One: The Loss of a Tooth

Let’s start from the beginning — the actual loss of any tooth or teeth.  The need for dental implantation doesn’t occur until and unless there has been a loss of the natural teeth. This loss is something which can happen for a variety of reasons, and they’re not always because your oral hygiene was found lacking.  Cavities, injuries or a mixture of oral cancers are just a few of the non-hygiene causes of tooth and bone loss. Once lost, the other teeth, the environment as well as the geography of the oral cavity changes, some of those changes beginning almost immediately after the loss.  The longer the oral cavity is allowed to exist without filling that space, the higher the chance that the geography is affected.

Step Two:  The Evaluation

Step two is the evaluation of the overall condition of oral structures.  Depending on the severity of the geographic state of the mouth, this evaluation may require several visits to complete, gauging not only the condition of the various tissues but also the overall health condition of the patient.  This latter consideration is vital because some health conditions can interfere with either the advancement of surgical planning or the medications are taken for them can impede or prevent the essential healing process needed to make the procedures successful.  One should also expect much questioning and discussions about oral hygiene regimens, both those currently in place as well as those required before, during and after the dental implantation process.

Next time, we will continue with this step-by-step discussion about the process of dental implantation.  Until then, Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can evaluate and treat gum disease in any stage of development in you and your family.  If dental implants are an option for you, he will happily provide his expertise to restore your mouth and smile to make you proud and healthier!  Call him at (631) 661-6633 or pay him a visit at https://drscharf.com and let him explain how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 3

Hello again, to all of our faithful followers and returning readers!  If you have been a regular follower of this blog, then you’re well aware that this blog is long-standing in its devotion to the education of Dr. Scharf’s patients as well as his readers.  Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research into the deep dark world of gum disease and how it can influence the lives of those afflicted with it.  Recently, we began a new article series on the process of dental implant treatment in which we hope to familiarize you with incredible newer technology for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. Last time, we promised that our next installment would be on the various types of dental implants and how they work, so, without further ado, let’s take another step in this journey down the road leading to the process of dental implant treatment.

First, General Information

There are two types of dental implants from which your dental professional can choose for your dental procedure.  The choice of implant is largely dependent upon the general health as well as the oral health of the patient. Xrays and a general review of your oral health will be utilized to determine the strength of the jawbone which will ultimately determine the type of implant which is best for you.  The presence of any periodontal or gum disease will also need to be evaluated and treated before the dental implantation process begins.

Two Types of Dental Implants

Now, we’ll move on to the two types of dental implants: Endosteal Implants and Subperiosteal Implants.  

  • Endosteal implants are posts which are implanted into the jawbone during a surgical procedure.  These posts are generally made of titanium but other materials are available for those people who, for a number of other health reasons, cannot tolerate the titanium material.  Once the area has healed from the placing of the post, a dental implant will be placed on the post and the artificial tooth will then be placed to complete the look of the new tooth.  
  • Subperiosteal implants are metal frames that are created and fitted to the jawbone, just below the gum tissue.  Once healing takes place, the metal frame is affixed to the jawbone and the posts (endosteal implants) are then attached to the metal frame.  The artificial teeth are then placed on the endosteal implants which are attached to the metal frame. Generally, endosteal implants are used to replace single missing teeth whereas the subperiosteal implant replaces areas of multiple missing teeth.

Once these dental implants are in place, they will function like the natural teeth they replaced, frequently performing even better than those natural teeth. These implants will last a lifetime and are cared for just like your natural teeth, enabling you to have a new set of functional and attractive teeth to renew your beautiful smile.  Your dental professional will need to follow your oral health routinely just as he would any other patient, watching for problems or issues which could result in a decrease in your oral health. Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island and he will be happy to evaluate and treat gum disease in you or any member of your family, giving the benefit of his surgical expertise in the event that dental implants are recommended for you.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 2

Welcome back!  For those of you who have been following this blog for any length of time. You know that this blog is long-standing in its devotion to the education of Dr. Scharf’s patients as well as his readers, regardless of how long you’ve been with us.  Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and any more modern research into the deep dark world of gum disease and how it can influence the lives of those afflicted with it.  Last week, we began a new article series on the process of dental implant treatment in which we hope to familiarize you with incredible more modern technology for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. So, without further ado, let’s get started on this journey down the road leading to the process of dental implant treatment.

More About Dental Implants

Last week, we concluded our blog post with a promise to talk about how dental implants work in our next post.  Today, we are making good on the statement and will be discussing how dental implants are designed to work. Last time, we talked about what dental implants are, explaining that they are the best replacement option for replacing missing teeth, whether the need is to replace single missing teeth or multiple ones.  But, in the explanation, we did not tell you exactly what a dental implant is because we felt that information would fit better into the scope of today’s blog post.

What Dental Implants Are

What dental implants are and what they do is pretty nifty when you think about it.  Dental implants are surgically positioned titanium screws into the jawbone in a space where the tooth or teeth are missing.  The titanium screw bonds or fuses with the surrounding jawbone, creating a robust and permanent anchor for the mounting of the artificial tooth or teeth.  The fused strength of the titanium screw with the jawbone creates a “root” which is strong enough to hold the replacement tooth and allow the chewing mechanism to work as designed by the Creator.

How Dental Implants Work

Solidly placed and fused tightly with the surrounding bony tissue, the dental implant can be, depending upon your oral health, stronger than your natural ones.  This permanent attachment eliminates the normal shifting to which natural teeth are prone, keeping the environment in your mouth more stable. These dental implants do not cause the sore spots, gagging and poor ridges which are common to dentures, nor do they fall prey to the problems that infections in the anchor teeth for bridges, whether fixed or removable, can cause.  Under these circumstances, the bridge anchor teeth can fail, requiring them to be removed and either redesigning of the bridge which was dependent upon them or another option to fill the gap thus created.

Next time, we will discuss the types of dental implants and how they work.  In the meantime, we urge you to get established with a dental professional for an appropriate evaluation of your oral health and that of each of your family members.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in the role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631) 661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 1

Welcome to all of our regular readers and those readers who are new to us today.  This blog is a long-standing one in which Dr. Scharf educates his patients and his readers, whether new or old in either category.  Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who enjoys keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and further research into the deep dark world of gum disease and how it can influence the lives of those afflicted with it.  Today, we begin a new article series on the process of dental implant treatment in which we hope to familiarize you with incredible more modern technology for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. So, without further ado, let’s get started on this journey down the road leading to the process of dental implant treatment.

What Are Dental Implants?

Before we can delve very deeply into this topic, we must first get some basic information out front.  You may wonder what exactly a dental implant IS? A dental implant is a newer and preferred way to replace missing teeth that is available to us today.  As people live their lives, sometimes situations occur, i.e., accidents, decayed teeth, weakened or loosened teeth, which result in some the loss of teeth, either singly or in multiples.  

The Options

When teeth are missing, two things are essential to understanding:

First, the mouth was designed to have a specific number of teeth, all of which have a particular function and which are placed in the appropriate sequence on the upper and lower plates to perform those functions efficiently.  When you lose teeth, spaces occur in the plate structure which results in areas not only allow the trapping of food but also the openness changes the way the chewing mechanism takes place.

The second thing essential to understand is that, as mentioned above, each tooth has an assigned function in the chewing process which also relates to the digestive processing of food.  Some teeth are for biting, some for cutting and some for mashing and chewing, and when the structure of both the lower as well as the upper plates are intact, every tooth does its job to efficiently break up food in preparation for its journey through the digestive tract.

By understanding these two principles, it follows that if the initially designed tooth configuration and chewing mechanism are changed or interrupted, the food, inadequately prepared,  travels through the gastric system in a form not intended, a situation which could cause issues as we age.

The Negatives

When teeth are missing, and this chewing mechanism changed, there are several options available to fill in the gaps (pun intended).  Those options include bridges (both removable as well as fixed), dentures and dental implants. Here are the negatives of the alternatives:

The bridges can erode adjacent teeth to which they have been affixed, causing loosening and additional eventual loss.

Dentures can be challenging to adjust to, interfere with eating and enjoying some foods and may need adjustments or replacement periodically.  

Dental implants are the closest permanent fix for missing teeth which our current technology can provide.  Recent advancements make this option even more attractive in that completion occurs within hours instead of weeks or months.

Next time, we’ll talk about how dental implants work.  In the meantime, we’d like to encourage you not to ignore those missing teeth.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in the role, he can identify and treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel, as well as guide you toward your best options for replacement of missing teeth.  Call Dr. Scharf at (631)661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com and let him explain the many ways he can help you.