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Peptic Ulcers and Gum Disease: Can You See a Connection? Part 3

Hello, again, to all of our faithful followers and new readers of our blog! If you are a frequent follower of this blog, then you are aware that we have developed this site with a reputation for educating our readers on a variety of dental and medical conditions, especially as they apply to the overall general health of our patients and readers.  Our Dr. Scharf, a Periodontist in Long Island, is a doctor who enjoys informing not only his patients but also his blog followers, in the many health conditions which affect both our physical overall health as well as our general dental health. Over the past couple of segments of this article series, we have been discussing the various causes of peptic ulcers, and today, we are picking up where we left off last time, discussing another common cause of peptic ulcers…so come along with us as we talk more about gum disease and peptic ulcers.

NSAIDs

Last time, we talked about some over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers like ibuprofen, naproxen sodium and aspirin (a.k.a. Motrin IB, Aleve, Anaprox, etc) that are commonly used for relief from pain relating to inflammation.  We also noted that many older adults are at higher risk of developing peptic ulcers since this age group suffers from arthritis and osteoarthritis and the inflammation that is generally associated with these conditions. These medications irritate the lining of the stomach and intestines which causes even more inflammation which leads to the birth of the ulcer.

Other Medications

While NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatories) are considered a cause for the development of peptic ulcers, they are not the only medication-related causative factors with which we must deal.  There are some other medications, taken for other health conditions, which, when taken with these NSAIDs, increase the risk of developing these types of ulcers a great deal. Here are some of those other medications:

  • Steroids
  • Anti-coagulants
  • Low-dose aspirin
  • Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)
  • Alendronate (a.k.a. Fosamax)
  • Risedronate (a.k.a. Actonel)

Next time, we will discuss the non-medication factors of peptic ulcer development.  While these don’t necessarily “cause” the ulcers, they certainly create an atmosphere inside your digestive system which wreaks havoc with your body’s natural healing abilities.  In the meantime, be sure to give Dr. Scharf a call at (631)661-6633 or pay him a visit online at https://drscharf.com.  He wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island and awaits the opportunity to tell you how he can treat gum and periodontal disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

Peptic Ulcers and Gum Disease: Can You See a Connection? Part 2

Welcome back! We are so grateful to all of our faithful followers who continue to read our blog and to those of you who are joining for perhaps the first time.  As some of you already know, this blog site has a reputation for educating our readers on a variety of dental and medical conditions, especially as they apply to the overall general health of our readers.  Our Dr. Scharf, a Periodontist in Long Island, loves to inform not only his patients but also his blog followers, in how the many biological systems in our bodies work together and depend upon each other for our best health.  Today, we are picking up where we left off last time, discussing another common cause of peptic ulcers…so come along with us as we talk more about gum disease and peptic ulcers.

Inflammation

In these busy times, many people suffer from myriad stressors, ranging from job responsibilities to child rearing to marriage and friendly relationships and health issues … and the seemingly endless list of stressors goes on and on.  All of these stressors, whether independently or combined, can wreak havoc on the functional efficiency of any of the systems which keep the human body running smoothly. How this interference with the normal functioning of any particular system or group of them occurs begins with the development of inflammation.  Unfortunately, avoiding some inflammation is physically impossible because it is part of the body’s immune system, designed to protect and heal when and where needed — think of it as the body’s first aid kit, white blood cells being dispatched to any and all parts of the body in which a foreign substance has been detected or where an injury has occurred. These cells do their repair job and then move on to the next weak spot.  

Certain pain medications

So, as you can see, inflammation of and by itself is not a bad thing.  It becomes a problem when this healing process becomes chronic and keeps growing where it isn’t performing its designed function, impeding the normal operation of any system.  Health conditions like coronary artery disease, arthritis, gum disease, and kidney problems are just a few of the resulting maladies which beset the human body when inflammation rages out of control.  Modern medicine and pharmacology have utilized some amazing technology to develop new medical procedures and medications to help fight this ongoing conflagration called chronic inflammation. Unfortunately, some of the medications developed for this purpose, as well as some formulated to treat those aforementioned maladies which spin off from chronic inflammation, can cause or exacerbate the very demon they’re trying to control.

What are those medications?

The medications to which we refer are found on both sides of the pharmacy counter — prescribed and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs.  When it comes to OTC medications, it is important to remember that they have been formulated not only of natural ingredients but also contain chemical ones.  Common remedies like aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil, etc.), naproxen sodium (Aleve, Anaprox, and others), and ketoprofen are considered non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and have the ability to irritate the stomach and intestinal lining, causing the inflammation which is so damaging.  This list does not include Tylenol (Acetaminophen). Also, it is important to note that peptic ulcers are more commonly found in older adults because they use many of these medications for the treatment of osteoarthritis and the inflammatory symptoms associated with it.

NSAIDs are not the only substances which increase the risks of developing peptic ulcers and, next time, we will talk about a few more of them.  In the meantime, we urge you to get established with a dental professional who can identify and treat gum disease in your entire family. Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in the role, he can identify and treat gum or periodontal disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

Peptic Ulcers and Gum Disease: Can You See a Connection? Part 1

Hello to all of our faithful followers and to those of you who are joining for perhaps the first time.  This blog site has a reputation for educating our readers on virtually anything dental, especially as it applies to the overall general health of our readers.  Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who loves to involve not only his patients but also his blog followers, in how the many biological systems in our bodies work together and depend upon each other for our best health.  A few months ago, we began a topic in an article series on peptic ulcers, part of a more extensive series discussing gum disease and gastrointestinal disease, explicitly showing how they are related. We published two segments on peptic ulcers but, due to some unforeseen issues, could not finish.  Thus, today, we are picking up where we left off…so come along with us as we talk more about gum disease and peptic ulcers.

A Brief Review

In past segments, as well as previous article series, we have talked about inflammation and some of the nightmares it causes in our mouths.  We have related to you the fact that this inflammation begins with bacteria feeding off residues left behind in your mouth from inadequate or infrequent cleanings, toothbrushing, and flossing. Good oral hygiene goes a long way toward hindering the development of this inflammation.

Sores or abrasions that develop in the lining of the stomach or upper part of the small intestine are called peptic ulcers.  The most commonly noted symptom of peptic ulcers are stomach pain, and this is true whether it is a gastric ulcer (occurring on the inside of the stomach) or duodenal (occurring in the upper section of the small intestine).  Here are some of the other symptoms you might notice if you have one of these types of ulcers:
A burning feeling of pain in the stomach

  • Feeling like you’re bloated, full, or belching
  • Problems eating fatty foods
  • The burning sensation in your throat that we call “heartburn.”
  • Feelings of nausea which are sometimes transient

Contrary to popular belief,  spicy foods and stress are NOT the root cause of these digestive maladies.  While it is quite true that these activities can certainly exacerbate the symptoms, they simply are not the cause.  

Normal Biology

In our last segment, we talked briefly about the environment in which the causative factors function.  From our last segment…”The digestive system operates using stomach acids to break down and digest what you eat and drink.  The various parts of the digestive system are designed with a mucous lining that is intended to protect the lining of those parts from the strong acids needed for digestion.  A peptic ulcer forms when the stomach acid erodes the inner surfaces of the stomach and small intestine. Normally, the mucus layer protects those inner surfaces from damage, that is, unless something else is interfering with the harmony between the stomach acid and the mucus layer. When that sensitive balance is upset, it is generally caused by an increased amount of stomach acid in the system or a decrease in the mucus layer…”

A Bacterium

Today, we will talk about one of the causes — a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori (H-pylori).  This bacterium lives in the lining of the stomach, those protective mucous layers that were talked about in previous segments.  H-pylori can live in that mucous layer without causing any problems at all, but sometimes it rears its ugly head and causes inflammation of the inner lining of the stomach, enter the aforementioned ulcer.  While modern medicine isn’t sure just exactly how this infection is spread from person to person, they suspect that kissing and other forms of close contact, as well as food and water, could cause the spread of this infection.  This particular bacterial infection is treatable with a “triple antibiotic” regimen which will be discussed in a later segment.

Next time, we’ll talk about another cause which may surprise you.  In the meantime, we would like to remind you that good oral hygiene and regular checkups are essential to a healthy mouth.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist on Long Island and, in that role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com, and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel

 

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 4

Greetings to our returning readers and newcomers to this blog site!  As always, we like to introduce new readers to Dr. Scharf. For those “seasoned” readers, you already know that our Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island, and he loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions on various health conditions which concern all of us, especially when health issues about overall general health, related to dental health, oral health, and gum disease, are the topic at hand.  We recently began a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are related.  In our last segment, we discussed peptic ulcers and some of the symptoms you might notice if you’re afflicted with this condition.  Today, we’d like to continue on that topic, discussing the causes of them to clear up the misconceptions about those causes. Won’t you join us as we continue to explore this topic?

Brief review

Last time, we explained that peptic stomach ulcers are sores that develop on the lining of the upper part of the small intestine and the lining of the stomach. We also pointed out that the most common symptom is stomach pain, but many people also experience “heartburn”, bloating, belching and transient feelings of nausea.  

A common misconception

One of the most common misconceptions about peptic ulcers is that they are caused by stress and the consumption of spicy foods.  While these conditions can certainly exacerbate the symptoms, gastro-intestinal evidence reveals that they are not causative factors.  There are several known culprits in this popular mystery, and we will talk briefly about each of them in the coming weeks, but first, let’s talk a bit about why they happen.

Normal biology

The digestive system operates using stomach acids to break down and digest what you eat and drink.  The various parts of the digestive system are designed with a mucous lining that is intended to protect the lining of those parts from the strong acids needed for digestion.  A peptic ulcer forms when the stomach acid erodes the inner surfaces of the stomach and small intestine. Normally, the mucus layer protects those inner surfaces from damage, that is, unless something else is interfering with the harmony between the stomach acid and the mucus layer. When that sensitive balance is upset, it is generally caused by an increased amount of stomach acid in the system or a decrease in the mucus layer.  

There are several reasons for the disruption of the interaction of these biological substances, and next time, we will talk about them.  In the meantime, we urge you to call Dr. Scharf and meet his staff. He wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island and wants to identify and treat gum disease in any of its various stages of development in every member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com so he can tell you how he treats gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 3

Hello again! We welcome returning readers and newcomers!  For new readers to this site, we would like to introduce you to Dr. Scharf.  Our Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions on various health conditions which concern all of us, especially when health issues about overall general health, related to dental health, oral health, and gum disease, are the topic at hand.  We recently began a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are related.  Come along with us as we continue to explore this topic, with today’s segment discussing peptic stomach ulcers.

Inflammation

In past segments, as well as previous article series, we have talked about inflammation and some of the nightmares it causes in our mouths.  We have related to you the fact that this inflammation begins with bacteria feeding off residues left behind in your mouth from inadequate or infrequent cleanings, toothbrushing, and flossing.  We have emphasized the importance of good oral hygiene in every member of the family, to prevent the inflammation, resulting from less than desirable oral health, from getting into the bloodstream and traveling everywhere and anywhere in the body.

Peptic Stomach Ulcers

Sores or abrasions that develop in the lining of the stomach or upper part of the small intestine are called peptic ulcers.  The most commonly noted symptom of peptic ulcers are stomach pain, and this is true whether it is a gastric ulcer (occurring on the inside of the stomach) or duodenal (occurring in the upper section of the small intestine).  Here are some of the other symptoms you might notice if you have one of these types of ulcers:
A burning feeling of pain in the stomach

  • Feeling like you’re bloated, full, or belching
  • Problems eating fatty foods
  • The burning sensation in your throat that we call “heartburn”
  • Feelings of nausea which are sometimes transient

While most people will tell you that stress and spicy foods are the cause of this sickness, your takeaway is that these do not create a peptic ulcer.  They will exacerbate the symptoms mentioned above, to be sure, but they aren’t the reason for the ulcer.

In our next segment, we will talk a bit more about these symptoms and the role that stomach acid plays in them.  Until then, we encourage you to seek to establish with a dental professional who can help. Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any of its stages in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or pay him a visit online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 2

We welcome back our returning readers and any newcomers to our blog!  For those of you who may be new to this blog site, let me introduce you to Dr. Scharf.  He is a Periodontist in Long Island and he loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions about a variety of health conditions which concern all of us.  This is especially so when there are health issues pertaining to overall general health which are related to dental health, oral health, and gum disease. Our last segment began a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are related.  You’re invited to join us as we continue this journey over the next several weeks.

A brief review

In our last segment, we briefly explained how the debris left behind from normal eating and drinking gets stuck to the internal surfaces of your mouth.  We further explained that, if these internal surfaces are not cleaned appropriately and regularly, the debris develops into inflammation, plaque, and the constant flow of nasty bacteria, via your bloodstream, into all parts of your body.

Stomach Ulcers

Gum disease, and the inflammation that accompanies it has been the subject of a great deal of research over the past several decades.  Direct connections have been established between gum disease and several major health problems, and even some life-threatening diseases, and stomach ulcers are among some of those discoveries.  The connection which has been established between gum disease and ulcers lies in the bacteria which is at the heart of the gum disease. It seems that these same periodontal disease bacteria are the very ones which cause stomach ulcers.  If the flow of these bacteria is not controlled, re-infections and new ulcers can occur.

The best way to control all of that inflammation is to brush your teeth and floss several times a day and keep up with regular dental examinations.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify and treat gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631) 661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.   Be sure to come back for the next segment of this important article series.

 

Gum Disease and Gastrointestinal Ulcers: Are They Related? Part 1

Welcome back, returning readers and newcomers to our blog!  If you are new to this blog site, you may not be aware that Dr. Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who loves to engage his readers and patients in discussions about a variety of health conditions which concern all of us.  He especially likes to educate his followers with these health maladies as they relate to overall oral health and gum disease. Today, we are beginning a new article series on gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers, and how they are connected.  As we embark upon this journey over the next several weeks, you’re invited to join us.

Gum Disease

Before we get started, let’s first review briefly so that we all understand what gum disease is and what is so dangerous about it. The most straightforward description of gum disease is: it is inflammation, caused by food and drink deposits left behind between the teeth and along the gum line which, if not properly removed, can cause bacterial growth, not all of which is good. There are both good bacteria as well as harmful bacteria in your mouth, coexisting in that lovely moist environment.  An ongoing battle waged between these types of bacteria, and sometimes the bad guys overrun the good guys, kind of like the fighting between the cowboys and Indians in the old West movies some of us grew up watching on television. 

The Why of this Battle

You see, when you chew food and drink liquids, pieces and films remain on the internal surfaces of your mouth, teeth, tongue, and gums. These foreign particles get lodged between the teeth and along the gum line, where bacteria naturally abide. The problem arises when this foreign material is not adequately removed by the brushing and flossing that is part of a good oral health regimen. When not suitably cleaned, bacteria begin to feed off it and grow, festering into an infection (also known as inflammation). This inflammation gets down below the gum line, eventually getting into the bloodstream, where it is transported to all parts of the body, into every organ and tissue type, wreaking havoc wherever it goes.

Next time, we will take the next step toward the connection between gum disease and gastrointestinal ulcers.  Until then, we encourage you to make your next step getting established with a great dental professional.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in the role, he can identify and treat gum disease in your whole family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com and let him tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 7

We welcome our returning readers and those of you who are new to this blog!  We appreciate your return for the last segment of this article series. If you have been following this blog for any length of time, we probably don’t need to tell you Dr. Scharf has long been reputed for devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  If you aren’t acquainted with Dr. David Scharf, allow me to introduce you to a man who is a Periodontist in Long Island, who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research, primarily as it influences their lives and those they love, who are afflicted with gum disease.  He thoroughly enjoys sharing information pertinent to his readers and patients health and well-being. This current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we have hoped to familiarize you with the incredible technological options which are available for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our past postings, we have been discussing the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation.  We invite you to continue this journey with us as we conclude this article series on dental implantation treatment with the promised discussion about post placement and final crown placement.  

Post Placement

Last week, we left off with the bone grafting technique having been completed and healing time commencing.  As we stated in the last segment of this series, this particular step in the dental implantation process generally requires at least four months of healing.  This healing time is only an estimate because each of our bodies is different regarding the healing properties of various types of tissue.

Once the gum and bone grafting sites are determined by Dr. Scharf to have healed sufficiently, he then proceeds with the placing of the posts for the dental implants.  These posts, made of titanium, are the new “roots” for your dental implants, and they are placed directly into the jawbone tissue. Local numbing medication is given, a hole pre-drilled into the jawbone, making it easier to insert the post.  Dr. Scharf then places the post into the pre-drilled hole and closes the gum tissue around it.

As you might expect, as with other steps in the process which involved cutting or drilling, Dr. Scharf must allow for time for healing before the final steps completed.  The healing of the bone and gum tissue, as well as the integration of the post with that tissue, requires approximately 4 to 6 months of time. Once appropriately healed, the head of the post uncovered and an abutment attached which will hold the final crown.

Final Crown Placement

The placement of the final crown may resemble that of the fitting required for dentures and bridges in that impressions must be made of the exposed post abutments and adjacent areas to ensure that an order placed for the crown will fit perfectly. For your new crown to blend in with the rest of your existing teeth (whether natural or implanted), a color matching process will be performed at the time of the impression.  Once these steps are taken, the order for your new crown is placed. Your new dental implant crown will most likely take a couple of weeks to be available, at which time, Dr. Scharf’s office will contact you for the visit to finish the job. The most significant part of this whole process is that your wait is over — since everything will have healed at each stage in the treatment when your crown placed, you can display it immediately for the world to see!

Though these steps seem like forever to complete, the result will be nothing short of miraculous, allowing you to beam that bright smile at everyone you meet.  Throughout the process, Dr. Scharf and his entire team are there for you, just as they are now, as you become established and consider your treatment options for the treatment of gum disease in any member of your family.  Call Dr. Scharf at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com. He wants to be your Periodontist on Long Island, and he wants to tell you how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 6

Hello, again!  We are happy that you are returning to the next segment of this article series, and we welcome our faithful followers as well as our new readers joining us for the first time!  As ongoing followers of this blog, I’m sure you will agree that we have already established that we have a long-standing reputation for devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  Dr. David Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who understands the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research. And since it influences the lives of those afflicted with gum disease, he loves to share any information which he feels is pertinent to his readers and patients.  This current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we hope to familiarize you with the incredible technological options which are available for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our past postings, we have been discussing the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation.  We invite you to join us as we continue this journey on the road to dental implantation treatment.

Tooth Extraction

After the evaluation and the pre-implant surgery, the next step for most patients is tooth extraction. So, are you wondering why more teeth may need extracting when you’re considering dental implantation for already missing teeth?  That’s a great question, and here is your answer: sometimes, the remaining teeth in the area of concern for the dental implant placement or in the upper and lower plates may be damaged, cracked clear down to the root, or infected.  If the existing teeth aren’t reasonably healthy, you are at an increased risk of additional problems down the road. The damaged or otherwise unhealthy teeth extracted and a dental implant put back in its place, and, sometimes, Dr. Scharf can even use the socket from which the damaged or diseased tooth was removed, placing the dental implant the same day!  A word of caution is needed here: same day placement may not always be possible if the socket from which the tooth came needs more time to heal.

Bone Grafting

The next step for most dental implant patients is bone grafting.  As frequently happens, sometimes a tooth “goes missing” for a variety of reasons and is not replaced in a timely fashion, for a variety of extenuating circumstances.  Though this is quite understandable, it is important to point out that the jaw bone begins to resorb or melt away immediately — losing approximately 25% of its height within the first year after the tooth loss!  Why is this important, you may wonder? Since the jaw bone is the primary supporting structure for the dental implants and on which the crowns eventually mounted, if the height of the jaw bone structure is not uniform, the post and the final crown placement can be compromised.  If bone grafting is required to accommodate the dental implant, then a healing period of a minimum of four (4) months is needed before the next step can be taken.

Next time, we will discuss the post placement and the final crown placement to complete the steps involved in dental implant treatment.  Until then, we want to strongly urge you to seek a dental professional to evaluate and monitor gum and periodontal disease in every member of your family.  Dr. Scharf wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and in that role, he can identify, treat and monitor gum disease in any stage of development in any member of your family.  Call him at (631)661-6633 or visit him on the web at https://drscharf.com and let him explain how he can treat gum disease with a laser instead of a scalpel.

 

How Much Do You Know About the Process of Dental Implant Treatment? Part 5

Welcome back!  We welcome you, whether you are returning readers, faithful followers or new readers who are joining us for the first time!  For those of you who have been ongoing readers of this blog, we believe we have already established that we have a long-standing reputation for its devotion to the improvement of our readers as well as the patients of Dr. Scharf.  As you may already be aware, Dr. David Scharf is a Periodontist in Long Island who, understanding the importance of keeping his followers up-to-date on new technology and modern research, and how it influences the lives of those afflicted with it, loves to share any information which he feels is pertinent to his readers and patients.  Our current article series focuses on the process of dental implant treatment, and we hope to familiarize you with the incredible technological options for the permanent replacement of missing teeth. In our last posting, we began a discussion about the step-by-step process involved in dental implantation. You are invited to ride along with us as we continue this journey on the road to dental implantation treatment.

More About the Evaluation

In our last blog post, we talked a bit about the evaluation, mentioning some general things which will be addressed by Dr. Scharf.  Dr. Scharf is a board certified Periodontist, but beyond that certification, he has amassed extra years of training in periodontal health as well as the process of placing the dental implants we’ve been discussing.  Because he has all of that extra training and experience, he will well-qualified to review the results of the examination itself, and the variety of imaging and testing, to determine what procedures for which you are best suited.  He will carefully examine and review the data, providing an in-depth explanation to you, to ensure you know exactly what conditions exist and what options are available to you.

Step Three:  Pre-Implant Surgery

Because some of the caused by gum disease can take years to surface in other systems and parts of our bodies, patients having periodontal disease who need dental implants may be relatively healthy beyond the destruction that is occurring in their mouths.  In this case, you’d likely be thinking that dental implant surgery could move forward fairly quickly, when in fact, the surgery to place the implants is delayed because of conditions in the mouth.  Now, the testing and imaging done in step two comes into play at this point, revealing the condition of the boney structures that need modification, or extra tooth removal to accommodate the dental implant, or even bone grafting needed to support the alveolar ridge.  While these procedures need time to heal like any other surgery, these surgeries will help your dental implants look and feel comfortable and attractive.

In our next post, we will discuss tooth extractions and bone grafting so that you have a better idea of the depth and details of the process.  Until then, we highly recommend that you call Dr. Scharf at (631)661-6633 or visit him online at https://drscharf.com.  He wants to be your Periodontist in Long Island, and he’ll be happy to tell you about how he can treat gum disease with a laser rather than a scalpel.